Everything you need to know about Bitcoin mining

Bitcoin - The Currency of the Internet

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Cryptocurrency News & Discussion

The official source for CryptoCurrency News, Discussion & Analysis.
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Mining Fedoracoin

The subreddit for all things to do with mining fedoracoin.
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Hi, i am interested in Bitcoin mining, can i ask if my PC can do so? specs:core i5-7500 gtx 1050ti 8gb ram msi h110m pro-vh600w power supply samsung 850 evo ssd and a 1tb hard drive thx /r/Bitcoin

Hi, i am interested in Bitcoin mining, can i ask if my PC can do so? specs:core i5-7500 gtx 1050ti 8gb ram msi h110m pro-vh600w power supply samsung 850 evo ssd and a 1tb hard drive thx /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

07-07 01:02 - 'Hi, i am interested in Bitcoin mining, can i ask if my PC can do so? specs:core i5-7500 gtx 1050ti 8gb ram msi h110m pro-vh600w power supply samsung 850 evo ssd and a 1tb hard drive thx' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/Anonymous_blaze removed from /r/Bitcoin within 869-879min

'''
tried it on nice harshminer with my gpu only and got 63c average
'''
Hi, i am interested in Bitcoin mining, can i ask if my PC can do so? specs:core i5-7500 gtx 1050ti 8gb ram msi h110m pro-vh600w power supply samsung 850 evo ssd and a 1tb hard drive thx
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: Anonymous_blaze
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: I have an Intel Core i5-3337U [email protected] GHz processor. Can I mine Verge or any other cryptocurrency for that matter? I did mine some bitcoin way back, like very small amount. Any leads appreciated. Tha /r/vergecurrency

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: I have an Intel Core i5-3337U CPU@1.80 GHz processor. Can I mine Verge or any other cryptocurrency for that matter? I did mine some bitcoin way back, like very small amount. Any leads appreciated. Tha /vergecurrency submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Why Osana takes so long? (Programmer's point of view on current situation)

I decided to write a comment about «Why Osana takes so long?» somewhere and what can be done to shorten this time. It turned into a long essay. Here's TL;DR of it:
The cost of never paying down this technical debt is clear; eventually the cost to deliver functionality will become so slow that it is easy for a well-designed competitive software product to overtake the badly-designed software in terms of features. In my experience, badly designed software can also lead to a more stressed engineering workforce, in turn leading higher staff churn (which in turn affects costs and productivity when delivering features). Additionally, due to the complexity in a given codebase, the ability to accurately estimate work will also disappear.
Junade Ali, Mastering PHP Design Patterns (2016)
Longer version: I am not sure if people here wanted an explanation from a real developer who works with C and with relatively large projects, but I am going to do it nonetheless. I am not much interested in Yandere Simulator nor in this genre in general, but this particular development has a lot to learn from for any fellow programmers and software engineers to ensure that they'll never end up in Alex's situation, especially considering that he is definitely not the first one to got himself knee-deep in the development hell (do you remember Star Citizen?) and he is definitely not the last one.
On the one hand, people see that Alex works incredibly slowly, equivalent of, like, one hour per day, comparing it with, say, Papers, Please, the game that was developed in nine months from start to finish by one guy. On the other hand, Alex himself most likely thinks that he works until complete exhaustion each day. In fact, I highly suspect that both those sentences are correct! Because of the mistakes made during early development stages, which are highly unlikely to be fixed due to the pressure put on the developer right now and due to his overall approach to coding, cost to add any relatively large feature (e.g. Osana) can be pretty much comparable to the cost of creating a fan game from start to finish. Trust me, I've seen his leaked source code (don't tell anybody about that) and I know what I am talking about. The largest problem in Yandere Simulator right now is its super slow development. So, without further ado, let's talk about how «implementing the low hanging fruit» crippled the development and, more importantly, what would have been an ideal course of action from my point of view to get out. I'll try to explain things in the easiest terms possible.
  1. else if's and lack any sort of refactoring in general
The most «memey» one. I won't talk about the performance though (switch statement is not better in terms of performance, it is a myth. If compiler detects some code that can be turned into a jump table, for example, it will do it, no matter if it is a chain of if's or a switch statement. Compilers nowadays are way smarter than one might think). Just take a look here. I know that it's his older JavaScript code, but, believe it or not, this piece is still present in C# version relatively untouched.
I refactored this code for you using C language (mixed with C++ since there's no this pointer in pure C). Take a note that else if's are still there, else if's are not the problem by itself.
The refactored code is just objectively better for one simple reason: it is shorter, while not being obscure, and now it should be able to handle, say, Trespassing and Blood case without any input from the developer due to the usage of flags. Basically, the shorter your code, the more you can see on screen without spreading your attention too much. As a rule of thumb, the less lines there are, the easier it is for you to work with the code. Just don't overkill that, unless you are going to participate in International Obfuscated C Code Contest. Let me reiterate:
Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
This is why refactoring — activity of rewriting your old code so it does the same thing, but does it quicker, in a more generic way, in less lines or simpler — is so powerful. In my experience, you can only keep one module/class/whatever in your brain if it does not exceed ~1000 lines, maybe ~1500. Splitting 17000-line-long class into smaller classes probably won't improve performance at all, but it will make working with parts of this class way easier.
Is it too late now to start refactoring? Of course NO: better late than never.
  1. Comments
If you think that you wrote this code, so you'll always easily remember it, I have some bad news for you: you won't. In my experience, one week and that's it. That's why comments are so crucial. It is not necessary to put a ton of comments everywhere, but just a general idea will help you out in the future. Even if you think that It Just Works™ and you'll never ever need to fix it. Time spent to write and debug one line of code almost always exceeds time to write one comment in large-scale projects. Moreover, the best code is the code that is self-evident. In the example above, what the hell does (float) 6 mean? Why not wrap it around into the constant with a good, self-descriptive name? Again, it won't affect performance, since C# compiler is smart enough to silently remove this constant from the real code and place its value into the method invocation directly. Such constants are here for you.
I rewrote my code above a little bit to illustrate this. With those comments, you don't have to remember your code at all, since its functionality is outlined in two tiny lines of comments above it. Moreover, even a person with zero knowledge in programming will figure out the purpose of this code. It took me less than half a minute to write those comments, but it'll probably save me quite a lot of time of figuring out «what was I thinking back then» one day.
Is it too late now to start adding comments? Again, of course NO. Don't be lazy and redirect all your typing from «debunk» page (which pretty much does the opposite of debunking, but who am I to judge you here?) into some useful comments.
  1. Unit testing
This is often neglected, but consider the following. You wrote some code, you ran your game, you saw a new bug. Was it introduced right now? Is it a problem in your older code which has shown up just because you have never actually used it until now? Where should you search for it? You have no idea, and you have one painful debugging session ahead. Just imagine how easier it would be if you've had some routines which automatically execute after each build and check that environment is still sane and nothing broke on a fundamental level. This is called unit testing, and yes, unit tests won't be able to catch all your bugs, but even getting 20% of bugs identified at the earlier stage is a huge boon to development speed.
Is it too late now to start adding unit tests? Kinda YES and NO at the same time. Unit testing works best if it covers the majority of project's code. On the other side, a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. If you decide to start refactoring your code, writing a unit test before refactoring will help you to prove to yourself that you have not broken anything without the need of running the game at all.
  1. Static code analysis
This is basically pretty self-explanatory. You set this thing once, you forget about it. Static code analyzer is another «free estate» to speed up the development process by finding tiny little errors, mostly silly typos (do you think that you are good enough in finding them? Well, good luck catching x << 4; in place of x <<= 4; buried deep in C code by eye!). Again, this is not a silver bullet, it is another tool which will help you out with debugging a little bit along with the debugger, unit tests and other things. You need every little bit of help here.
Is it too late now to hook up static code analyzer? Obviously NO.
  1. Code architecture
Say, you want to build Osana, but then you decided to implement some feature, e.g. Snap Mode. By doing this you have maybe made your game a little bit better, but what you have just essentially done is complicated your life, because now you should also write Osana code for Snap Mode. The way game architecture is done right now, easter eggs code is deeply interleaved with game logic, which leads to code «spaghettifying», which in turn slows down the addition of new features, because one has to consider how this feature would work alongside each and every old feature and easter egg. Even if it is just gazing over one line per easter egg, it adds up to the mess, slowly but surely.
A lot of people mention that developer should have been doing it in object-oritented way. However, there is no silver bullet in programming. It does not matter that much if you are doing it object-oriented way or usual procedural way; you can theoretically write, say, AI routines on functional (e.g. LISP)) or even logical language if you are brave enough (e.g. Prolog). You can even invent your own tiny programming language! The only thing that matters is code quality and avoiding the so-called shotgun surgery situation, which plagues Yandere Simulator from top to bottom right now. Is there a way of adding a new feature without interfering with your older code (e.g. by creating a child class which will encapsulate all the things you need, for example)? Go for it, this feature is basically «free» for you. Otherwise you'd better think twice before doing this, because you are going into the «technical debt» territory, borrowing your time from the future by saying «I'll maybe optimize it later» and «a thousand more lines probably won't slow me down in the future that much, right?». Technical debt will incur interest on its own that you'll have to pay. Basically, the entire situation around Osana right now is just a huge tale about how just «interest» incurred by technical debt can control the entire project, like the tail wiggling the dog.
I won't elaborate here further, since it'll take me an even larger post to fully describe what's wrong about Yandere Simulator's code architecture.
Is it too late to rebuild code architecture? Sadly, YES, although it should be possible to split Student class into descendants by using hooks for individual students. However, code architecture can be improved by a vast margin if you start removing easter eggs and features like Snap Mode that currently bloat Yandere Simulator. I know it is going to be painful, but it is the only way to improve code quality here and now. This will simplify the code, and this will make it easier for you to add the «real» features, like Osana or whatever you'd like to accomplish. If you'll ever want them back, you can track them down in Git history and re-implement them one by one, hopefully without performing the shotgun surgery this time.
  1. Loading times
Again, I won't be talking about the performance, since you can debug your game on 20 FPS as well as on 60 FPS, but this is a very different story. Yandere Simulator is huge. Once you fixed a bug, you want to test it, right? And your workflow right now probably looks like this:
  1. Fix the code (unavoidable time loss)
  2. Rebuild the project (can take a loooong time)
  3. Load your game (can take a loooong time)
  4. Test it (unavoidable time loss, unless another bug has popped up via unit testing, code analyzer etc.)
And you can fix it. For instance, I know that Yandere Simulator makes all the students' photos during loading. Why should that be done there? Why not either move it to project building stage by adding build hook so Unity does that for you during full project rebuild, or, even better, why not disable it completely or replace with «PLACEHOLDER» text for debug builds? Each second spent watching the loading screen will be rightfully interpreted as «son is not coding» by the community.
Is it too late to reduce loading times? Hell NO.
  1. Jenkins
Or any other continuous integration tool. «Rebuild a project» can take a long time too, and what can we do about that? Let me give you an idea. Buy a new PC. Get a 32-core Threadripper, 32 GB of fastest RAM you can afford and a cool motherboard which would support all of that (of course, Ryzen/i5/Celeron/i386/Raspberry Pi is fine too, but the faster, the better). The rest is not necessary, e.g. a barely functional second hand video card burned out by bitcoin mining is fine. You set up another PC in your room. You connect it to your network. You set up ramdisk to speed things up even more. You properly set up Jenkins) on this PC. From now on, Jenkins cares about the rest: tracking your Git repository, (re)building process, large and time-consuming unit tests, invoking static code analyzer, profiling, generating reports and whatever else you can and want to hook up. More importantly, you can fix another bug while Jenkins is rebuilding the project for the previous one et cetera.
In general, continuous integration is a great technology to quickly track down errors that were introduced in previous versions, attempting to avoid those kinds of bug hunting sessions. I am highly unsure if continuous integration is needed for 10000-20000 source lines long projects, but things can be different as soon as we step into the 100k+ territory, and Yandere Simulator by now has approximately 150k+ source lines of code. I think that probably continuous integration might be well worth it for Yandere Simulator.
Is it too late to add continuous integration? NO, albeit it is going to take some time and skills to set up.
  1. Stop caring about the criticism
Stop comparing Alex to Scott Cawton. IMO Alex is very similar to the person known as SgtMarkIV, the developer of Brutal Doom, who is also a notorious edgelord who, for example, also once told somebody to kill himself, just like… However, being a horrible person, SgtMarkIV does his job. He simply does not care much about public opinion. That's the difference.
  1. Go outside
Enough said. Your brain works slower if you only think about games and if you can't provide it with enough oxygen supply. I know that this one is probably the hardest to implement, but…
That's all, folks.
Bonus: Do you think how short this list would have been if someone just simply listened to Mike Zaimont instead of breaking down in tears?
submitted by Dezhitse to Osana [link] [comments]

Building an Ethereum Mining Rig (13 GPU) - 4th part

Third update to the guide "Building a Mining Rig for Ethereum". The absolute first guide to building a RX Vega 64 8gb 13 GPU Mining Rig.
Reading this guide to building a 13 GPU Ethereum mining rig requires adequate knowledge of building and running an Ethereum Mining Rig. We therefore recommend a previous view of our Guide to build a Mining Rig and related updates.

Let's immediately list the hardware used:

- Asus Mining Master X370 mainboard
- Core i5 Coffee Lake CPU
- 480 or 500GB SSD
- 32Gb Ram
- 13 GPU RX Vega 64 8Gb
- 3 x 1000W power supplies
- 1 1200W power supply
- 8Gb USB stick

In this guide we will obviously not explain how to mount the hardware of a Rig. The only notes we wish to underline are the following:

- the 1200W power supply must be the primary one on which to connect 4 GPUs and the video output for the monitor

- all the risers, as well as obviously the GPUs, must be powered through the 8-pole connections of the power supplies. We strongly advise against the use of 6-pole ports. Therefore, have the appropriate number of cables available for all connections. Risers can also be powered in pairs.

- the model of the video card used is the Asus Rog Strixx Gaming RX Vega 64 8Gb


The operating system is Windows 10 updated to the latest version available. The tool for creating installation media is available at the following link https://www.microsoft.com/it-it/software-download/windows10 to be able to use the USB key as a launcher for installing Windows 10 .

With the Asus Mining Master, the GPU risers can be connected directly to the motherboard via the USB cable, thus making one of the small components of the riser kits unusable.

After making all the connections on the motherboard, check that all GPUs are highlighted in green when the PC starts up. If not, move the USB cable on the motherboard one position. It may take at least 2 or 3 attempts.

Ethereum mining with 13 GPUs
Having solved this possible small inconvenience, let's proceed with the installation of the AMD Adrenaline 2020 drivers, always updated to the latest version, relating to the RX Vega Series.

If you want to proceed with more caution, the advice is to disconnect all the GPUs (remembering the locations of the USB cables) except one before installing the drivers.

The mining will be carried out on the Ethermine pool, our favorite, using the Claymore 15 software.


Once the download is complete, you will have to unzip the folder on the desktop and open the start.bat file contained in the Claymore folder using Notepad. The procedure is the usual one: delete the content and copy-paste the following command string:

start config.dll -epool eu1.ethermine.org:14444 -ewal "your ETH wallet address" -epsw x -worker "worker"
EthDcrMiner64.exe

Where EthDcrMiner64.exe is the executable, -epool indicates the pool to mine and its port, -ewal is the wallet address and -epsw is the password that we leave blank (X).

In place of "your wallet address" you will have to put your Ethererum wallet and instead of worker you will enter an identification number in case you plan to build more RIGs (such as RIG1, RIG2, etc ...).

At the following link, many other useful commands for your Rig:
https://github.com/Claymore-Dual/Claymore-Dual-Miner

Try to run mining and check that the system is stable.

In the Payouts section, after a few minutes of mining, you can decide the minimum amount of Ether to be sent to your wallet by simply entering the IP address of the RIG.

We performed the mining directly on the Ethereum address of the Exodus wallet. Coinbase is not supported.

Overclocking with OverdriveNTool
Let's proceed now with the download of OverdrivenTool at the following link: https://forums.guru3d.com/threads/overdriventool-tool-for-amd-gpus.416116/


For those unfamiliar with it, we recommend reading our software guide.

For those who do not intend to experiment or do not completely trust their software experience, at the following link you can view the settings on the parameters of the GPUs and the RAM of the GPUs - and other small tricks - to obtain the best possible performance without forcing the cards too much. video.

On our Youtube channel (subscribe numerous !!!) you will now be able to see the video relating to the start of mining and the one concerning the stabilization phase.

To better cool the Rig we have also installed fans for the extraction of heat as caution is never too much. Moreover, there is also an aesthetic gain.

Conclusions on the guide to build a 13 gpu ethereum mining rig.
Finally, we conclude this guide by reporting what everyone was waiting for (we do not say how long we had to wait before obtaining this result) the video link complhttps: //www.youtube.com/watch? V = k53XZn3zc9I & t = 61seto del Rig e del Mining .

We remain available for any advice, both on pools, on yield and on consumption.

Feel free to contact us in case you run into any problems where our guide to Building a 13 GPU Ethereum Mining Rig has not been completely helpful.

See you soon.


If you liked this article and would like to contribute with a donation:

Bitcoin: 1Ld9b165ZYHZcY9eUQmL9UjwzcphRE5S8Z
Ethereum: 0x8D7E456A11f4D9bB9e6683A5ac52e7DB79DBbEE7
Litecoin: LamSRc1jmwgx5xwDgzZNoXYd6ENczUZViK
Stellar: GBLDIRIQWRZCN5IXPIKYFQOE46OG2SI7AFVWFSLAHK52MVYDGVJ6IXGI
Ripple: rUb8v4wbGWYrtXzUpj7TxCFfUWgfvym9xf

By: cryptoall.it
Telegram Channel: t.me/giulo75
Netbox Browser: https://netbox.global/PZn5A
Horizen Faucet: https://getzen.cash/auth/register?ref=153228
submitted by Giulo75 to u/Giulo75 [link] [comments]

Alienware Alpha R1 is 2020

Alienware Alpha R1 in 2020*

Mistyped the title...
This is going to be a simple guide to help any R1 owner upgrade and optimize their Alpha.

Upgradable Parts

(In order of importance)
Storage Unit:
HDD OUT
SSD IN
This is by far the easiest upgrade to make and the most effective.
https://www.newegg.com/p/pl?N=100011693%20600038463
Any of those will work, just needs to be 2.5 Inch SATA.
How to Replace Video

WIFI Card:
This is like a 5-15$ upgrade. Go find any Intel 7265ngw off eBay and replace it with your current WIFI card. If you don’t want to buy used then here.
How to Replace Video

RAM:
Ram prices have tanked because of bitcoin mining, so this has become quite a cheap upgrade as well. I’d recommend 16GB just because why not, but if your tight on cash 8GB is fine.
https://www.newegg.com/p/pl?N=100007609%20601190332%20601342186%20600000401&Order=BESTMATCH
How to Replace Video

CPU:
This required the most research. I’d recommend you look through this first. The wattage of the processor slot only ranges from 35w-50w according to a developer of the Alpha (Source). The socket type is LGA 1150.
If you’re going cheap, the i5-4590t (35w) and i5-4690s (65w) are both great options.
i5-4590t
i5-4690s
The i5-4690t (45w) is also great but is hard to find from a trustworthy source for a reasonable price.
If your willing to spend $100+ then easily the i7-4790t (45w). That is probably the best processor to put in the Alpha. All 45w will be used giving you 3.9 GHz Turbo. The T series apparently runs the best on the R1 according to This Reddit post.
How to Replace Video

GPU:
Coming Soon!

Maxed out Alpha R1 specs: i7-4790t, 1TB Samsung SSD, 16GB DDR3, Nvidia Geforce GTX 860m.
(Upgrading to anything better then that is pointless)

Optimizing the Alpha R1

Peripherals

submitted by Kidd-Valley to AlienwareAlpha [link] [comments]

Mining noob, I have some questions

Hi everyone, a quick intro here: I come from a professional horticulture background. I've been learning about computers, networking, network security and Linux sys. admin for the last two years. I built a bunch of gaming computers for my kids and I with a bonus check I got in fall of 2017, right before the 2017 "bitcoin bubble". By luck I grabbed all my parts before the price of GPU's skyrocketed. All I've been doing though is learning about Linux and game development, learning digital art like 3D modeling, and streaming video games.
I'm now learning to mine ZEC with tpruvot/ccminer 2.3.1 in Ubuntu 20.04 with Nvidia proprietary driver vers. 440 & CUDA toolkit 10.1. I'm just learning how to do this and understand I'm not making a profit. I'ts more a learning experience and a hobby sort of thing for now. I dont really care if the system breaks, I have another computer with AMD RX560 that I work and game on Linux with. I cant mine with the pollaris GPU because I cant install OpenCL. There is no support for 20.04 from catalyst driver as of now.
TL;DR I'm a noob and wondering why my hashrate is what it is. I am only using 1 GPU as of now (Nvidia 1050Ti 4GB) and mining on a pool. I get an average of 140 Sol/s. Is this essentially the same as H/s and is that a normal number for my card? Should I add a 2nd GPU I have if it's only a 1050 2GB? Also, I am using nvtop & htop packages to monitor PC stats, it shows it's using 99% of GPU and 100% of a single core of my CPU (intel i5 6402P @ 3.2GHz) fans and temps are good.
But it shows I'm only using .6GB / 4GB while mining, is that right? Shouldn't it be using more memory? Would it be overkill to mine with CPU miner at the same time as the 2 cards?
Sorry about the essay, and thanks for your time
submitted by starseed-pl to zec [link] [comments]

Is my PC actually good enough...

Hello everyone, Im quite new here so hope I get this right.
I have Pc mostly for gaming, maybe 3 years old, cost me about 800€ then, and I considered it to be mid-tier back then. It has:
Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-6400 CPU @ 2.70 GhZ 12 GB RAM 64 Bit, Windows 10 Nvidia Geforce GT 730
So I actually have several questions but Im gonna try and be compact. The most pressing is that I bought Read Dead Redemption 2 thinking that it would run at least kind of ok on low settings. It doesn't. around 10 fps is the best I can get with everything on low and its obviously unplayable.
Also it seems that lowering settings doesn't realy decrease the graphics, as does the ping. So I get the same ping from low settings or high (roughly) and things still look very shiny on low graphics. I really don't know too much about these topics so I hope I dont ridiculed too badly - my friend told me I propably have a "bitcoin mining thing" thats draining my CPU/GPU. Is this possible/realistic? (Sorry if its a dump question)
The Big question I guess is, how would I start upgrading this PC to make it more viable?
Thanks to everyone in advance! Cheers
submitted by Kaliv_oda to techsupport [link] [comments]

Error on benchmarking cpu

Hey. I'm very new to bitcoin mining and have no previous experience. I'm trying to benchmark my Intel core i5 3470 but i get several errors while trying. I have tried opening as admin and i have tried disabling windows defender but no luck. I have also tried benchmarking with "precise". Can someone help me?
https://preview.redd.it/mc2a8stn2wi41.png?width=1280&format=png&auto=webp&s=f05a4bbb53e54b6f057a353a0831ceda30093935
submitted by SergeantRetard to NiceHash [link] [comments]

Once again I am asking for your assistance. Years ago you helped me build my 1st PC. It is time to upgrade. Included pictures of battle station and other questions.

Hi everyone. My build is starting to show its age. The more I try to do, the more I see its age. at the bottom of the post you can see my current build.
What is your intended use for this build? The more details the better.
If gaming, what kind of performance are you looking for? (Screen resolution, framerate, game settings)
What is your budget (ballpark is okay)?
In what country are you purchasing your parts?
Post a draft of your potential build here (specific parts please). Consider formatting your parts list. Don't ask to be spoonfed a build (read the rules!).
PCPartPicker Part List
Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $369.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler Deepcool CASTLE 360EX 64.4 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $141.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard ASRock Z370 Taichi ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $299.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $76.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $76.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung 850 EVO-Series 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive -
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB WINDFORCE Video Card $1099.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Define R5 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $154.72 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA G2 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply -
Monitor Asus ROG Strix XG438Q 43.0" 3840x2160 120 Hz Monitor $1099.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $3320.65
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-04-15 01:24 EDT-0400
Provide any additional details you wish below.
Here is the computer I got help on years ago on this sub.
PCPartPicker Part List
Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-2500K 3.3 GHz Quad-Core Processor -
Motherboard Asus P8Z68 Deluxe ATX LGA1155 Motherboard -
Memory Kingston HyperX Fury Blue 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR3-1600 Memory -
Storage Samsung 850 EVO-Series 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive -
Video Card MSI Radeon RX 480 4 GB GAMING X Video Card -
Case Fractal Design Define R5 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $154.72 @ Amazon
Power Supply Thermaltake TR2 600 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply -
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $154.72
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-04-15 01:34 EDT-0400
Questions I Have
Thanks for the help!
submitted by joeweezy10 to buildapc [link] [comments]

Wondering if it’s worth it to upgrade my current PC or start over?

So I built my computer when bitcoin mining was still pretty popular and I paid more than I should have for some of the things in the build which meant I couldn’t get exactly what I wanted for the budget I had.
Now I am having issues with my CPU and Drive constantly running at 100% and my computer being slow in general sometimes.
I want to be able to run modern and upcoming AAA titles without huge issues. The thing is I’m not experienced enough to know what I need to replace or if I need to replace certain parts to replace that and so on and so forth.
So here’s my build:
OS - Windows 10
Motherboard - MSI B250M Bazooka (MS-7A70)
CPU/Processor - Intel Core i5 7500 @ 3.40ghz
GPU/Graphics Card - Zotac GeForce GTX 1050-Ti 4gb
Ram - Crucial Ballistix Sport DDR4 2400 C16 2x4gb
Hard Drive - WD Blue 1 TB
Case - DeepCool Tesseract Mid-Tower Case (Blue/Black)
Keyboard - Razer Cynosa Chroma
Mouse - Steel series Rival 300 Mouse
Mouse Pad - Rager Goliathus Chroma
Speakers/Subwoofer - Logitech Z313 2-1 channel 3 piece speaker system with subwoofer
Monitor: Lenovo LI2264D wide 21.5 inch
So if you guys could help me out and let me know what I could replace to make this bad boy run better and able to do what I want it to do or if you guys think I should just start over. Thanks a bunch
submitted by no312 to buildapc [link] [comments]

I5 6600k 100% usage

Hey Reddit! I've got an i5 6600k with a GTX 1070. While gaming I frequently run at all cores 100%. Some games this is easily replicated in is COD MW, insurgency sandstorm, and GTA V. Just wondering if my CPU is dying (did Bitcoin mine for a short while) or if this is common for this processor
submitted by PlepperGuy to intel [link] [comments]

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submitted by MULTIELECTRONICS to u/MULTIELECTRONICS [link] [comments]

Hardware for vr

I currently have a windows mixed reality headset and it works pretty well for what I paid for. I can start basically every game. The real problem is my hardware. I have an intel motherboard with a core i5-2400 and gtx 1060 3gb. Also have 16gb ddr3 ram. I get dropped frames in a lot of the more intense situations, but climbey and pavlov vr run next to perfect. In my closet I have an i5 2500k, but I’m not sure it would be a huge improvement. I have a biostar tb-250 PRO BTC bitcoin mining motherboard that’ll fit a 6th or 7th gen intel chip. What cpu/graphics card should I upgrade to next? Looking not to spend more than $500
submitted by flaccidcock to VRGaming [link] [comments]

Looking to upgrade/redo current PC build

I built my PC a couple years ago when bitcoin mining was popular and paid more than I should have for the build I got. Now I’m looking to either start fresh and reuse parts that are viable in a new build or to see if it’s just possible to upgrade some things to make my PC run better. Right now it’s not great for modern AAA games and the like.
What will you be doing with this PC? Be as specific as possible, and include specific games or programs you will be using.
What is your maximum budget before rebates/shipping/taxes?
  • I would prefer to keep it around 800 but can go up to 1000 if absolutely needed
When do you plan on building/buying the PC? Note: beyond a week or two from today means any build you receive will be out of date when you want to buy.
  • Around Black Friday/Cyber Monday most likely
What, exactly, do you need included in the budget? (ToweOS/monitokeyboard/mouse/etc)
  • I don’t necessarily need a monitokeyboard/mouse as I already have those but they are barebones so if I can include them in my budget I’d be willing to upgrade
Which country (and state/province) will you be purchasing the parts in? If you're in US, do you have access to a Microcenter location?
  • Michigan, USA. Yes I have a micro center near me
If reusing any parts (including monitor(s)/keyboard/mouse/etc), what parts will you be reusing? Brands and models are appreciated.
  • The parts listed below are all the ones I have in my build currently. I’m not sure if it would be worth it upgrading separate parts or building a whole new one and reusing what I can, so I included a full part list.
  • OS - Windows 10
  • Motherboard - MSI B250M Bazooka (MS-7A70)
  • CPU/Processor - Intel Core i5 7500 @ 3.40ghz
  • GPU/Graphics Card - Zotac GeForce GTX 1050-Ti 4gb
  • Ram - Crucial Ballistix Sport DDR4 2400 C16 2x4gb
  • Hard Drive - WD Blue 1 TB
  • Case - DeepCool Tesseract Mid-Tower Case (Blue/Black)
  • Keyboard - Razer Cynosa Chroma
  • Mouse - Steel series Rival 300 Mouse
  • Mouse Pad - Rager Goliathus Chroma
  • Speakers/Subwoofer - Logitech Z313 2-1 channel 3 piece speaker system with subwoofer
  • Monitor: Lenovo LI2264D wide 21.5 inch
Will you be overclocking? If yes, are you interested in overclocking right away, or down the line? CPU and/or GPU?
  • Not 100% as I have no experience overclocking
Are there any specific features or items you want/need in the build? (ex: SSD, large amount of storage or a RAID setup, CUDA or OpenCL support, etc)
  • I would like an SSD but that’s all I can think of
Do you have any specific case preferences (Size like ITX/microATX/mid-towefull-tower, styles, colors, window or not, LED lighting, etc), or a particular color theme preference for the components?
  • I would prefer a mid tower size just because I don’t have all the space in the world for a huge tower. See through window and rgb/blue theme if possible
Do you need a copy of Windows included in the budget? If you do need one included, do you have a preference?
  • No
Extra info or particulars:
  • I think I covered it all, thank you to anyone who helps me out!
submitted by no312 to buildapcforme [link] [comments]

Geez, I'm middle aged now. Help me tweak my build.

I have a toddler now, and I can't completely re-educate myself for 2019 parts, so I'm hoping you all can help me figure out if/how I'm going wrong, or if I can get better value for money.
 
My rig from 2010 is on its last legs, and I'm looking to replace.
(In case anyone's nostalgic, it's an i5-760//4GB//Radeon HD5800)
 
I don't want anyone to build this for me - I'm just looking for advice.
My budget is in the 600-900 range. I'm not looking to max-out my budget, but I'd love to know if there are places where I can get better value for money.
I'm in Connecticut.
Keyboard, mouse, speakers, and monitor are separate. I'm fine on my own with that.
 
Use Case - probably pretty light.
Productivity: I'd like to be able to either dual-monitor or use a 4k (not both at the same time).
Gaming: Single monitor, 1080P, and not necessarily the latest and greatest. I'm a patient gamer, and considering my next game will be Axiom Verge or something N64-era.
Overclocking is not expected.
My toddler may end up using it for awhile, but I'm sure he'll need a new one by the time he's 8 or so.
 
Build:
 
PCPartPicker Part List
Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5 GHz Quad-Core Processor $79.89 @ OutletPC
Thermal Compound Arctic Silver 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver 3.5 g Thermal Paste $6.16 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $79.78 @ OutletPC
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $77.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung 970 Evo 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $89.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $44.84 @ Amazon
Video Card Sapphire Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card $169.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT H500 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Best Buy
Power Supply Corsair CX (2017) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $44.89 @ OutletPC
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $99.99 @ Best Buy
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $798.41
Mail-in rebates -$35.00
Total $763.41
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-08-13 22:25 EDT-0400
 
Pointed questions:
  1. Am I wasting money with both a 2200G AND dedicated graphics? If so, will the CPU be enough for me, or ought I go with a different chip/card combo?
  2. I kind of guessed at the Graphics card, based on the stickied builds and number of reviews. I'm happy to hear suggestions.
  3. Do I need a separate cooleheatsink? (judging from the stickied builds, no?) Does the CPU come with a stock one?
  4. I could save a few bucks with a 0.25TB SSD. Meh, I'll go with 0.5TB.
  5. I could probably go for 8GB memory, but 16GB may make it last longer.
  6. HDD reliability is pretty important to me. Any insights on manufacturer reputations are very welcome.
  7. Boring cases are fine.
 
Thanks to all for your help!
 
Edit: Learning to format.
 
 
Edit 2:
Guys, GUYS!
There's been a lot of really good suggestions here. Thanks to everyone.
 
But we're not maxing out the budget for the sake of it.
Check out the use case - or the title! I gave up on current-level graphics and FPS games some time ago. I'm not paying $250 for a graphics card (or competing with BitCoin miners).
 
In fact, how far could I downgrade my graphics card, and still hit my targets for desktop apps (and still be able to do much older games)?
For games, let's target: "I could ably play MineCraft without gameplay problems, but the graphics might be mid-level."
 
Here's my "Mark 2":
 
Upgraded the processor - thanks, dar! The 2600X was only $10 extra so I went with that.
Changed the Storage solution to a SSD. - thanks lild.
Changed PSU. - thanks lild.
Removed Windows 10 - will look into that, but it's not something that needs to go into compatibility/performance discussions.
submitted by QuicklyReged to buildmeapc [link] [comments]

Want to upgrade my PC, would like advice

Hi all,
I built my current PC for ~£600 about five years ago, so its starting to get a bit outdated and occasionally laggy. I'm looking to upgrade but I don't know where to start!
I think I want to be upgrading my GPU and SSD, but I'm not sure if this would mean that I need up update my mobo/psu/cooler too. If something else is the bottleneck here, or you need any other information, please let me know!
My current setup looks like this: PCPartPicker Part List
Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-4430 3 GHz Quad-Core Processor -
Motherboard Asus - H81M-K Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard -
Memory Kingston - 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR3-1600 Memory £78.62 @ Amazon UK
Storage SanDisk - Ultra Plus 128 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive -
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive -
Video Card XFX - Radeon R9 280X 3 GB Double Dissipation Video Card -
Case Cooler Master - N200 MicroATX Mini Tower Case £42.33 @ Amazon UK
Power Supply EVGA - 500 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply £52.98 @ CCL Computers
Optical Drive Samsung - SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer -
Thanks for any advice!
submitted by Sibblin to buildapc [link] [comments]

UpgradeMeAPC? Hoping to (re)build a "do-everything" PC; what devices might I need, and need to upgrade?

I already have a desktop PC, but I am planning a summer project with my roommates to upgrade some of it and have a wall-mounted, water-cooled, monster-of-a-machine that essentially "does everything," within relatively-sane reason. The wall mounting is completely up to us and still in the planning stages, but the advantage here is that it allows us to craft a case that can potentially fit all kinds of neat things in/on it, from the watercooling rig we're looking into to the buttload of additional drives (hard drives and otherwise) we may want to stick onto it.

"Does everything" essentially means that we'd be hoping to be able to do effectively anything from game, burn CD/DVD/Blu-Ray discs, read ZIP (yep, we still have some of those around) and 5.5"/3.25" disks, "professionally" (one of us is a graphic designer for a local magazine, so there's that) edit photos and video, record home-studio-quality sound (I record audiobooks for my students, for example), maybe even mine bitcoin (lol?) and more.

Some of the parts I have already include:
- GeForce GTX 1080 G1 ( https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01GJEE9BG/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 , probably need a better one or a second one if we do the bitcoin....erm...thing. This is probably the part I'm least willing to upgrade, as they tend to be the most expensive, but I'm still all ears)
- Intel Core i5 660K 3.5GHz CPU ( https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B012M8M7TY/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 , could maybe upgrade)
- Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB DDR4 D2666MHz C16 memory ( https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0123ZC44Y/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 , definitely open to upgrading this)
- ASUS Z170-A Mainboard ( https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B012NH05UW/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1, likely need to update this based on our "needs" for the build we're hoping to accomplish )
- FocusRite Scarlett Solo USB Audio Interface ( https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01E6T56CM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 )
- Behringer B-1 Condenser Microphone ( https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002KZAK8/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 , also have a pretty nice stand and filters for it but am open to further suggestions. Not looking to upgrade the microphone itself but if you want to recommend a nice desktop stand for it, or cables, or pop filters, or whatever, I'm all ears!)
- 5-port PCI USB ( https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LZWC7TL/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1, willing to upgrade if this one happens to be a piece of junk )
It also has two internal hard drives (I can upgrade these how/whenever, doesn't really matter right now but I'm looking for high-capacity recommendations), and a whole lot of USB interfacing (keyboard and mouse are separate, microphone is another, have an external blu-ray drive, a Bluetooth USB dongle, a Playstation DexDrive, and more).
Recommendations for layouts are absolutely welcome (like I said, we're still just planning right now) and for other components like fans and watercooling components are also welcome and appreciated. We're not flying blind, but we ARE flying with essentially just guidance from Google and what other subreddits turn up.

I'm not super sure where or how to start, since the PC I have now is the first PC I've built since 2000, so any help is appreciated!
submitted by BuckyDuran to buildmeapc [link] [comments]

Max CPU and GPU Usage on Any Setting

I'm a bit concerned about what Anthem will do to my computer in the long run. I don't have the best system but it's not bad by any stretch of the imagination. I'm running an i5-7500 3.40 GHz and a GTX 1060 6GB and both are pegged at 100% usage constantly. I know things look nice in this but there's no reason why I should see that much CPU and GPU being utilized when I'm sitting at the start screen unless it's secretly mining bitcoin in the background. This needs to be fixed because I don't want to replace my GFX card and CPU core in a matter of months due to constant max usage. I envision it like running an engine at full throttle constantly and if that's not the case with a computer please educate me, otherwise devs, you need to fix this.
submitted by nolas85 to AnthemTheGame [link] [comments]

My Lightning Node, now with a sticker

I wanted something more powerful then raspberry pi or odroid-hc1 so I have built this fanless computer with 1TB SSD for the blockchain. I think it is around 10W power consumption.. but I need new power metter because mine broke.

https://preview.redd.it/hu9ocls8p6b21.jpg?width=4128&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=5b24705770ae8f766a63c8cda138615be9cb2a18
Parts used:
At first I wanted to run the system OS from a USB drive, but 120GB SSD were super cheap so I just added that additional drive for the system.
The most expensive part when you built such node is the SSD drive, so price wise it is very close to rasbery pi + ssd, so if you need reliable, fast enough and ultra quite node, this might be the build for you.
You can change the size of the SSD, but I just figured that going forward blackchains will grow so I didn't want to upgrade later the SSD. I also run other blockchains on it, except bitcoin.
It can't measure to an i5 CPU for example, but it is enough powerful for the actual use it is intended, and no bottlenecks like SATA limitations or USB 2.0 on some of the SoCs.
submitted by KAMEHOB to btc [link] [comments]

Console gaming is hardly different from PC gaming, and much of what people say about PC gaming to put it above console gaming is often wrong.

I’m not sure about you, but for the past few years, I’ve been hearing people go on and on about PCs "superiority" to the console market. People cite various reasons why they believe gaming on a PC is “objectively” better than console gaming, often for reasons related to power, costs, ease-of-use, and freedom.
…Only problem: much of what they say is wrong.
There are many misconceptions being thrown about PC gaming vs Console gaming, that I believe need to be addressed. This isn’t about “PC gamers being wrong,” or “consoles being the best,” absolutely not. I just want to cut through some of the stuff people use to put down console gaming, and show that console gaming is incredibly similar to PC gaming. I mean, yes, this is someone who mainly games on console, but I also am getting a new PC that I will game on as well, not to mention the 30 PC games I already own and play. I’m not particularly partial to one over the other.
Now I will mainly be focusing on the PlayStation side of the consoles, because I know it best, but much of what I say will apply to Xbox as well. Just because I don’t point out many specific Xbox examples, doesn’t mean that they aren’t out there.

“PCs can use TVs and monitors.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is the implication of one, and overall just… confusing. This is in some articles and the pcmasterrace “why choose a PC” section, where they’re practically implying that consoles can’t do this. I mean, yes, as long as the ports of your PC match up with your screen(s) inputs, you could plug a PC into either… but you could do the same with a console, again, as long as the ports match up.
I’m guessing the idea here is that gaming monitors often use Displayport, as do most dedicated GPUs, and consoles are generally restricted to HDMI… But even so, monitors often have HDMI ports. In fact, PC Magazine has just released their list of the best gaming monitors of 2017, and every single one of them has an HDMI port. A PS4 can be plugged into these just as easily as a GTX 1080.
I mean, even if the monitoTV doesn’t have HDMI or AV to connect with your console, just use an adaptor. If you have a PC with ports that doesn’t match your monitoTV… use an adapter. I don’t know what the point of this argument is, but it’s made a worrying amount of times.

“On PC, you have a wide range of controller options, but on console you’re stuck with the standard controller."

Are you on PlayStation and wish you could use a specific type of controller that suits your favorite kind of gameplay? Despite what some may believe, you have just as many options as PC.
Want to play fighting games with a classic arcade-style board, featuring the buttons and joystick? Here you go!
Want to get serious about racing and get something more accurate and immersive than a controller? Got you covered.
Absolutely crazy about flying games and, like the racers, want something better than a controller? Enjoy!
Want Wii-style motion controls? Been around since the PS3. If you prefer the form factor of the Xbox One controller but you own a PS4, Hori’s got you covered. And of course, if keyboard and mouse it what keeps you on PC, there’s a PlayStation compatible solution for that. Want to use the keyboard and mouse that you already own? Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
Of course, these aren’t isolated examples, there are plenty of options for each of these kind of controllers. You don’t have to be on PC to enjoy alternate controllers.

“On PC you could use Steam Link to play anywhere in your house and share games with others.”

PS4 Remote play app on PC/Mac, PSTV, and PS Vita.
PS Family Sharing.
Using the same PSN account on multiple PS4s/Xbox Ones and PS3s/360s, or using multiple accounts on the same console.
In fact, if multiple users are on the same PS4, only one has to buy the game for both users to play it on that one PS4. On top of that, only one of them has to have PS Plus for both to play online (if the one with PS Plus registers the PS4 as their main system).
PS4 Share Play; if two people on separate PS4s want to play a game together that only one of them owns, they can join a Party and the owner of the game can have their friend play with them in the game.
Need I say more?

“Gaming is more expensive on console.”

Part one, the Software
This is one that I find… genuinely surprising. There’s been a few times I’ve mentioned that part of the reason I chose a PS4 is for budget gaming, only to told that “games are cheaper on Steam.” To be fair, there are a few games on PSN/XBL that are more expensive than they are on Steam, so I can see how someone could believe this… but apparently they forgot about disks.
Dirt Rally, a hardcore racing sim game that’s… still $60 on all 3 platforms digitally… even though its successor is out.
So does this mean you have to pay full retail for this racing experience? Nope, because disk prices.
Just Cause 3, an insane open-world experience that could essentially be summed up as “break stuff, screw physics.” And it’s a good example of where the Steam price is lower than PSN and XBL:
Not by much, but still cheaper on Steam, so cheaper on PC… Until you look at the disk prices.
See my point? Often times the game is cheaper on console because of the disk alternative that’s available for practically every console-available game. Even when the game is brand new.
Dirt 4 - Remember that Dirt Rally successor I mentioned?
Yes, you could either buy this relatively new game digitally for $60, or just pick up the disk for a discounted price. And again, this is for a game that came out 2 months ago, and even it’s predecessor’s digital cost is locked at $60. Of course, I’m not going to ignore the fact that Dirt 4 is currently (as of writing this) discounted on Steam, but on PSN it also happens to be discounted for about the same amount.
Part 2: the Subscription
Now… let’s not ignore the elephant in the room: PS Plus and Xbox Gold. Now these would be ignorable, if they weren’t required for online play (on the PlayStation side, it’s only required for PS4, but still). So yes, it’s still something that will be included in the cost of your PS4 or Xbox One/360, assuming you play online. Bummer, right?
Here’s the thing, although that’s the case, although you have to factor in this $60 cost with your console, you can make it balance out, at worst, and make it work out for you as a budget gamer, at best. As nice as it would be to not have to deal with the price if you don’t want to, it’s not like it’s a problem if you use it correctly.
Imagine going to a new restaurant. This restaurant has some meals that you can’t get anywhere else, and fair prices compared to competitors. Only problem: you have to pay a membership fee to have the sides. Now you can have the main course, sit down and enjoy your steak or pasta, but if you want to have a side to have a full meal, you have to pay an annual fee.
Sounds shitty, right? But here’s the thing: not only does this membership allow you to have sides with your meal, but it also allows you to eat two meals for free every month, and also gives you exclusive discounts for other meals, drinks, and desserts.
Let’s look at PS Plus for a minute: for $60 per year, you get:
  • 2 free PS4 games, every month
  • 2 free PS3 games, every month
  • 1 PS4/PS3 and Vita compatible game, and 1 Vita-only game, every month
  • Exclusive/Extended discounts, especially during the weekly/seasonal sales (though you don’t need PS Plus to get sales, PS Plus members get to enjoy the best sales)
  • access to online multiplayer
So yes, you’re paying extra because of that membership, but what you get with that deal pays for it and then some. In fact, let’s ignore the discounts for a minute: you get 24 free PS4 games, 24 free PS3 games, and 12 Vita only + 12 Vita compatible games, up to 72 free games every year. Even if you only one of these consoles, that’s still 24 free games a year. Sure, maybe you get games for the month that you don’t like, then just wait until next month.
In fact, let’s look at Just Cause 3 again. It was free for PS Plus members in August, which is a pretty big deal. Why is this significant? Because it’s, again, a $60 digital game. That means with this one download, you’ve balanced out your $60 annual fee. Meaning? Every free game after that is money saved, every discount after that is money saved. And this is a trend: every year, PS Plus will release a game that balances out the entire service cost, then another 23 more that will only add icing to that budget cake. Though, you could just count games as paying off PS Plus until you hit $60 in savings, but still.
All in all, PS Plus, and Xbox Gold which offers similar options, saves you money. On top of that, again, you don't need to have these to get discounts, but with these memberships, you get more discounts.
Now, I’ve seen a few Steam games go up for free for a week, but what about being free for an entire month? Not to mention that; even if you want to talk about Steam Summer Sales, what about the PSN summer sale, or again, disc sale discounts? Now a lot of research and math would be needed to see if every console gamer would save money compared to every Steam gamer for the same games, but at the very least? The costs will balance out, at worst.
Part 3, the Systems
  • Xbox and PS2: $299
  • Xbox 360 and PS3: $299 and $499, respectively
  • Xbox One and PS4: $499 and $399, respectively.
Rounded up a few dollars, that’s $1,000 - $1,300 in day-one consoles, just to keep up with the games! Crazy right? So called budget systems, such a rip-off.
Well, keep in mind that the generations here aren’t short.
The 6th generation, from the launch of the PS2 to the launch of the next generation consoles, lasted 5 years, 6 years based on the launch of the PS3 (though you could say it was 9 or 14, since the Xbox wasn’t discontinued until 2009, and the PS2 was supported all the way to 2014, a year after the PS4 was released). The 7th gen lasted 7 - 8 years, again depending on whether you count the launch of the Xbox 360 to PS3. The 8th gen so far has lasted 4 years. That’s 17 years that the console money is spread over. If you had a Netflix subscription for it’s original $8 monthly plan for that amount of time, that would be over $1,600 total.
And let’s be fair here, just like you could upgrade your PC hardware whenever you wanted, you didn’t have to get a console from launch. Let’s look at PlayStation again for example: In 2002, only two years after its release, the PS2 retail price was cut from $300 to $200. The PS3 Slim, released 3 years after the original, was $300, $100-$200 lower than the retail cost. The PS4? You could’ve either gotten the Uncharted bundle for $350, or one of the PS4 Slim bundles for $250. This all brings it down to $750 - $850, which again, is spread over a decade and a half. This isn’t even counting used consoles, sales, or the further price cuts that I didn’t mention.
Even if that still sounds like a lot of money to you, even if you’re laughing at the thought of buying new systems every several years, because your PC “is never obsolete,” tell me: how many parts have you changed out in your PC over the years? How many GPUs have you been through? CPUs? Motherboards? RAM sticks, monitors, keyboards, mice, CPU coolers, hard drives— that adds up. You don’t need to replace your entire system to spend a lot of money on hardware.
Even if you weren’t upgrading for the sake of upgrading, I’d be amazed if the hardware you’ve been pushing by gaming would last for about 1/3 of that 17 year period. Computer parts aren’t designed to last forever, and really won’t when you’re pushing them with intensive gaming for hours upon hours. Generally speaking, your components might last you 6-8 years, if you’ve got the high-end stuff. But let’s assume you bought a system 17 years ago that was a beast for it’s time, something so powerful, that even if it’s parts have degraded over time, it’s still going strong. Problem is: you will have to upgrade something eventually.
Even if you’ve managed to get this far into the gaming realm with the same 17 year old hardware, I’m betting you didn’t do it with a 17 year Operating System. How much did Windows 7 cost you? Or 8.1? Or 10? Oh, and don’t think you can skirt the cost by getting a pre-built system, the cost of Windows is embedded into the cost of the machine (why else would Microsoft allow their OS to go on so many machines).
Sure, Windows 10 was a free upgrade for a year, but that’s only half of it’s lifetime— You can’t get it for free now, and not for the past year. On top of that, the free period was an upgrade; you had to pay for 7 or 8 first anyway.
Point is, as much as one would like to say that they didn’t need to buy a new system every so often for the sake of gaming, that doesn’t mean they haven’t been paying for hardware, and even if they’ve only been PC gaming recently, you’ll be spending money on hardware soon enough.

“PC is leading the VR—“

Let me stop you right there.
If you add together the total number of Oculus Rifts and HTC Vives sold to this day, and threw in another 100,000 just for the sake of it, that number would still be under the number of PSVR headsets sold.
Why could this possibly be? Well, for a simple reason: affordability. The systems needed to run the PC headsets costs $800+, and the headsets are $500 - $600, when discounted. PSVR on the other hand costs $450 for the full bundle (headset, camera, and move controllers, with a demo disc thrown in), and can be played on either a $250 - $300 console, or a $400 console, the latter recommended. Even if you want to say that the Vive and Rift are more refined, a full PSVR set, system and all, could cost just over $100 more than a Vive headset alone.
If anything, PC isn’t leading the VR gaming market, the PS4 is. It’s the system bringing VR to the most consumers, showing them what the future of gaming could look like. Not to mention that as the PlayStation line grows more powerful (4.2 TFLOP PS4 Pro, 10 TFLOP “PS5…”), it won’t be long until the PlayStation line can use the same VR games as PC.
Either way, this shows that there is a console equivalent to the PC VR options. Sure, there are some games you'd only be able to play on PC, but there are also some games you'd only be able to play on PSVR.
…Though to be fair, if we’re talking about VR in general, these headsets don’t even hold a candle to, surprisingly, Gear VR.

“If it wasn’t for consoles holding devs back, then they would be able to make higher quality games.”

This one is based on the idea that because of how “low spec” consoles are, that when a developer has to take them in mind, then they can’t design the game to be nearly as good as it would be otherwise. I mean, have you ever seen the minimum specs for games on Steam?
GTA V
  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs) / AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs) @ 2.5GHz
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA 9800 GT 1GB / AMD HD 4870 1GB (DX 10, 10.1, 11)
Just Cause 3
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2500k, 3.3GHz / AMD Phenom II X6 1075T 3GHz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 (2GB) / AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB)
Fallout 4
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2300 2.8 GHz/AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0 GHz or equivalent
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 550 Ti 2GB/AMD Radeon HD 7870 2GB or equivalent
Overwatch
  • CPU: Intel Core i3 or AMD Phenom™ X3 8650
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 460, ATI Radeon™ HD 4850, or Intel® HD Graphics 4400
Witcher 3
  • Processor: Intel CPU Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz / AMD CPU Phenom II X4 940
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GPU GeForce GTX 660 / AMD GPU Radeon HD 7870
Actually, bump up all the memory requirements to 8 GBs, and those are some decent specs, relatively speaking. And keep in mind these are the minimum specs to even open the games. It’s almost as if the devs didn’t worry about console specs when making a PC version of the game, because this version of the game isn’t on console. Or maybe even that the consoles aren’t holding the games back that much because they’re not that weak. Just a hypothesis.
But I mean, the devs are still ooobviously having to take weak consoles into mind right? They could make their games sooo much more powerful if they were PC only, right? Right?
No. Not even close.
iRacing
  • CPU: Intel Core i3, i5, i7 or better or AMD Bulldozer or better
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVidia GeForce 2xx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory / AMD 5xxx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory
Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds
  • CPU: Intel Core i3-4340 / AMD FX-6300
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • GPU: nVidia GeForce GTX 660 2GB / AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB
These are PC only games. That’s right, no consoles to hold them back, they don’t have to worry about whether an Xbox One could handle it. Yet, they don’t require anything more than the Multiplatform games.
Subnautica
  • CPU: Intel Haswell 2 cores / 4 threads @ 2.5Ghz or equivalent
  • Memory: 4GB
  • GPU: Intel HD 4600 or equivalent - This includes most GPUs scoring greater than 950pts in the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark
Rust
  • CPU: 2 ghz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 11 (they don’t even list a GPU)
So what’s the deal? Theoretically, if developers don’t have to worry about console specs, then why aren’t they going all-out and making games that no console could even dream of supporting?
Low-end PCs.
What, did you think people only game on Steam if they spent at least $500 on gaming hardware? Not all PC gamers have gaming-PC specs, and if devs close their games out to players who don’t have the strongest of PCs, then they’d be losing out on a pretty sizable chunk of their potential buyers.
Saying “devs having to deal with consoles is holding gaming back” is like saying “racing teams having to deal with Ford is holding GT racing back.” A: racing teams don’t have to deal with Ford if they don’t want to, which is probably why many of them don’t, and B: even though Ford doesn’t make the fastest cars overall, they still manage to make cars that are awesome on their own, they don’t even need to be compared to anything else to know that they make good cars.
I want to go back to that previous point though, developers having to deal with low-end PCs, because it’s integral to the next point:

“PCs are more powerful, gaming on PC provides a better experience.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is… misleading.
Did you know that according to the Steam Hardware & Software Survey (July 2017) , the percentage of Steam gamers who use a GPU that's less powerful than that of a PS4 Slim’s GPU is well over 50%? Things get dismal when compared to the PS4 Pro (Or Xbox One X). On top of that, the percentage of PC gamers who own a Nvidia 10 series card is about 20% (about 15% for the 1060, 1080 and 1070 owners).
Now to be fair, the large majority of gamers have CPUs with considerably high clock speeds, which is the main factor in CPU gaming performance. But, the number of Steam gamers with as much RAM or more than a PS4 or Xbox One is less than 50%, which can really bottleneck what those CPUs can handle.
These numbers are hardly better than they were in 2013, all things considered. Sure, a PS3/360 weeps in the face of even a $400 PC, but in this day in age, consoles have definitely caught up.
Sure, we could mention the fact that even 1% of Steam accounts represents over 1 million accounts, but that doesn’t really matter compared to the 10s of millions of 8th gen consoles sold; looking at it that way, sure the number of Nvidia 10 series owners is over 20 million, but that ignores the fact that there are over 5 times more 8th gen consoles sold than that.
Basically, even though PCs run on a spectrum, saying they're more powerful “on average” is actually wrong. Sure, they have the potential for being more powerful, but most of the time, people aren’t willing to pay the premium to reach those extra bits of performance.
Now why is this important? What matters are the people who spent the premium cost for premium parts, right? Because of the previous point: PCs don’t have some ubiquitous quality over the consoles, developers will always have to keep low-end PCs in mind, because not even half of all PC players can afford the good stuff, and you have to look at the top quarter of Steam players before you get to PS4-Pro-level specs. If every Steam player were to get a PS4 Pro, it would be an upgrade for over 60% of them, and 70% of them would be getting an upgrade with the Xbox One X.
Sure, you could still make the argument that when you pay more for PC parts, you get a better experience than you could with a console. We can argue all day about budget PCs, but a console can’t match up to a $1,000 PC build. It’s the same as paying more for car parts, in the end you get a better car. However, there is a certain problem with that…

“You pay a little more for a PC, you get much more quality.”

The idea here is that the more you pay for PC parts, the performance increases at a faster rate than the price does. Problem: that’s not how technology works. Paying twice as much doesn’t get you twice the quality the majority of the time.
For example, let’s look at graphics cards, specifically the GeForce 10 series cards, starting with the GTX 1050.
  • 1.8 TFLOP
  • 1.35 GHz base clock
  • 2 GB VRAM
  • $110
This is our reference, our basis of comparison. Any percentages will be based on the 1050’s specs.
Now let’s look at the GTX 1050 Ti, the 1050’s older brother.
  • 2.1 TFLOP
  • 1.29 GHz base clock
  • 4 GB VRAM
  • $140 retail
This is pretty good. You only increase the price by about 27%, and you get an 11% increase in floating point speed and a 100% increase (double) in VRAM. Sure you get a slightly lower base clock, but the rest definitely makes up for it. In fact, according to GPU boss, the Ti managed 66 fps, or a 22% increase in frame rate for Battlefield 4, and a 54% increase in mHash/second in bitcoin mining. The cost increase is worth it, for the most part.
But let’s get to the real meat of it; what happens when we double our budget? Surely we should see a massive increase performance, I bet some of you are willing to bet that twice the cost means more than twice the performance.
The closest price comparison for double the cost is the GTX 1060 (3 GB), so let’s get a look at that.
  • 3.0 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 3 GB VRAM
  • $200 retail
Well… not substantial, I’d say. About a 50% increase in floating point speed, an 11% increase in base clock speed, and a 1GB decrease in VRAM. For [almost] doubling the price, you don’t get much.
Well surely raw specs don’t tell the full story, right? Well, let’s look at some real wold comparisons. Once again, according to GPU Boss, there’s a 138% increase in hashes/second for bitcoin mining, and at 99 fps, an 83% frame rate increase in Battlefield 4. Well, then, raw specs does not tell the whole story!
Here’s another one, the 1060’s big brother… or, well, slightly-more-developed twin.
  • 3.9 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 6 GB VRAM
  • $250 retail
Seems reasonable, another $50 for a decent jump in power and double the memory! But, as we’ve learned, we shouldn’t look at the specs for the full story.
I did do a GPU Boss comparison, but for the BF4 frame rate, I had to look at Tom’s Hardware (sorry miners, GPU boss didn’t cover the mHash/sec spec either). What’s the verdict? Well, pretty good, I’d say. With 97 FPS, a 79% increase over the 1050— wait. 97? That seems too low… I mean, the 3GB version got 99.
Well, let’s see what Tech Power Up has to say...
94.3 fps. 74% increase. Huh.
Alright alright, maybe that was just a dud. We can gloss over that I guess. Ok, one more, but let’s go for the big fish: the GTX 1080.
  • 9.0 TFLOP
  • 1.6 GHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $500 retail
That jump in floating point speed definitely has to be something, and 4 times the VRAM? Sure it’s 5 times the price, but as we saw, raw power doesn’t always tell the full story. GPU Boss returns to give us the run down, how do these cards compare in the real world?
Well… a 222% (over three-fold) increase in mHash speed, and a 218% increase in FPS for Battlefield 4. That’s right, for 5 times the cost, you get 3 times the performance. Truly, the raw specs don’t tell the full story.
You increase the cost by 27%, you increase frame rate in our example game by 22%. You increase the cost by 83%, you increase the frame rate by 83%. Sounds good, but if you increase the cost by 129%, and you get a 79% (-50% cost/power increase) increase in frame rate. You increase it by 358%, and you increase the frame rate by 218% (-140% cost/power increase). That’s not paying “more for much more power,” that’s a steep drop-off after the third cheapest option.
In fact, did you know that you have to get to the 1060 (6GB) before you could compare the GTX line to a PS4 Pro? Not to mention that at $250, the price of a 1060 (6GB) you could get an entire PS4 Slim bundle, or that you have to get to the 1070 before you beat the Xbox One X.
On another note, let’s look at a PS4 Slim…
  • 1.84 TFLOP
  • 800 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $300 retail
…Versus a PS4 Pro.
  • 4.2 TFLOP
  • 911 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $400 retail
128% increase in floating point speed, 13% increase in clock speed, for a 25% difference in cost. Unfortunately there is no Battlefield 4 comparison to make, but in BF1, the frame rate is doubled (30 fps to 60) and the textures are taken to 11. For what that looks like, I’ll leave it up to this bloke. Not to even mention that you can even get the texture buffs in 4K. Just like how you get a decent increase in performance based on price for the lower-cost GPUs, the same applies here.
It’s even worse when you look at the CPU for a gaming PC. The more money you spend, again, the less of a benefit you get per dollar. Hardware Unboxed covers this in a video comparing different levels of Intel CPUs. One thing to note is that the highest i7 option (6700K) in this video was almost always within 10 FPS (though for a few games, 15 FPS) of a certain CPU in that list for just about all of the games.
…That CPU was the lowest i3 (6100) option. The lowest i3 was $117 and the highest i7 was $339, a 189% price difference for what was, on average, a 30% or less difference in frame rate. Even the lowest Pentium option (G4400, $63) was often able to keep up with the i7.
The CPU and GPU are usually the most expensive and power-consuming parts of a build, which is why I focused on them (other than the fact that they’re the two most important parts of a gaming PC, outside of RAM). With both, this “pay more to get much more performance” idea is pretty much the inverse of the truth.

“The console giants are bad for game developers, Steam doesn't treat developers as bad as Microsoft or especially Sony.”

Now one thing you might’ve heard is that the PS3 was incredibly difficult for developers to make games for, which for some, fueled the idea that console hardware is difficult too develop on compared to PC… but this ignores a very basic idea that we’ve already touched on: if the devs don’t want to make the game compatible with a system, they don’t have to. In fact, this is why Left 4 Dead and other Valve games aren’t on PS3, because they didn’t want to work with it’s hardware, calling it “too complex.” This didn’t stop the game from selling well over 10 million units worldwide. If anything, this was a problem for the PS3, not the dev team.
This also ignores that games like LittleBigPlanet, Grand Theft Auto IV, and Metal Gear Solid 4 all came out in the same year as Left 4 Dead (2008) on PS3. Apparently, plenty of other dev teams didn’t have much of a problem with the PS3’s hardware, or at the very least, they got used to it soon enough.
On top of that, when developing the 8th gen consoles, both Sony and Microsoft sought to use CPUs that were easier for developers, which included making decisions that considered apps for the consoles’ usage for more than gaming. On top of that, using their single-chip proprietary CPUs is cheaper and more energy efficient than buying pre-made CPUs and boards, which is far better of a reason for using them than some conspiracy about Sony and MS trying to make devs' lives harder.
Now, console exclusives are apparently a point of contention: it’s often said that exclusive can cause developers to go bankrupt. However, exclusivity doesn’t have to be a bad thing for the developer. For example, when Media Molecule had to pitch their game to a publisher (Sony, coincidentally), they didn’t end up being tied into something detrimental to them.
Their initial funding lasted for 6 months. From then, Sony offered additional funding, in exchange for Console Exclusivity. This may sound concerning to some, but the game ended up going on to sell almost 6 million units worldwide and launched Media Molecule into the gaming limelight. Sony later bought the development studio, but 1: this was in 2010, two years after LittleBigPlanet’s release, and 2: Media Molecule seem pretty happy about it to this day. If anything, signing up with Sony was one of the best things they could’ve done, in their opinion.
Does this sound like a company that has it out for developers? There are plenty of examples that people will use to put Valve in a good light, but even Sony is comparatively good to developers.

“There are more PC gamers.”

The total number of active PC gamers on Steam has surpassed 120 million, which is impressive, especially considering that this number is double that of 2013’s figure (65 million). But the number of monthly active users on Xbox Live and PSN? About 120 million (1, 2) total. EDIT: You could argue that this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, sure, so if you want to, say, compare the monthly number of Steam users to console? Steam has about half of what consoles do, at 67 million.
Now, back to the 65 million total user figure for Steam, the best I could find for reference for PlayStation's number was an article giving the number of registered PSN accounts in 2013, 150 million. In a similar 4-year period (2009 - 2013), the number of registered PSN accounts didn’t double, it sextupled, or increased by 6 fold. Considering how the PS4 is already at 2/3 of the number of sales the PS3 had, even though it’s currently 3 years younger than its predecessor, I’m sure this trend is at least generally consistent.
For example, let’s look at DOOM 2016, an awesome faced-paced shooting title with graphics galore… Of course, on a single platform, it sold best on PC/Steam. 2.36 million Steam sales, 2.05 million PS4 sales, 1.01 million Xbox One sales.
But keep in mind… when you add the consoles sales together, you get over 3 million sales on the 8th gen systems. Meaning: this game was best sold on console. In fact, the Steam sales have only recently surpassed the PS4 sales. By the way VG charts only shows sales for physical copies of the games, so the number of PS4 and Xbox sales, when digital sales are included, are even higher than 3 million.
This isn’t uncommon, by the way.
Even with the games were the PC sales are higher than either of the consoles, there generally are more console sales total. But, to be fair, this isn’t anything new. The number of PC gamers hasn’t dominated the market, the percentages have always been about this much. PC can end up being the largest single platform for games, but consoles usually sell more copies total.
EDIT: There were other examples but... Reddit has a 40,000-character limit.

"Modding is only on PC."

Xbox One is already working on it, and Bethesda is helping with that.
PS4 isn't far behind either. You could argue that these are what would be the beta stages of modding, but that just means modding on consoles will only grow.

What’s the Point?

This isn’t to say that there’s anything wrong with PC gaming, and this isn’t to exalt consoles. I’m not here to be the hipster defending the little guy, nor to be the one to try to put down someone/thing out of spite. This is about showing that PCs and consoles are overall pretty similar because there isn’t much dividing them, and that there isn’t anything wrong with being a console gamer. There isn’t some chasm separating consoles and PCs, at the end of the day they’re both computers that are (generally) designed for gaming. This about unity as gamers, to try to show that there shouldn’t be a massive divide just because of the computer system you game on. I want gamers to be in an environment where specs don't separate us; whether you got a $250 PS4 Slim or just built a $2,500 gaming PC, we’re here to game and should be able to have healthy interactions regardless of your platform.
I’m well aware that this isn’t going to fix… much, but this needs to be said: there isn’t a huge divide between the PC and consoles, they’re far more similar than people think. There are upsides and downsides that one has that the other doesn’t on both sides. There’s so much more I could touch on, like how you could use SSDs or 3.5 inch hard drives with both, or that even though PC part prices go down over time, so do consoles, but I just wanted to touch on the main points people try to use to needlessly separate the two kinds of systems (looking at you PCMR) and correct them, to get the point across.
I thank anyone who takes the time to read all of this, and especially anyone who doesn’t take what I say out of context. I also want to note that, again, this isn’tanti-PC gamer.” If it were up to me, everyone would be a hybrid gamer.
Cheers.
submitted by WhyyyCantWeBeFriends to unpopularopinion [link] [comments]

Is this normal : 100h/s ??

Hi, I started mining bitcoin not long ago, and it seems to me that the amount of bitcoins I get is so little approximately 0.1$/day, then I looked at the speed of my mining and it says: 100h/s. That is not profitable at all, how would I fix it. CPU: Intel Core i5 3340 GPU: Gegabyte Nvidia Geforce 740 GT HELP PLEASE 🙏
submitted by tmyonsson to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

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How to mine $1,000,000 of Bitcoin using just a laptop ...

Mining Bitcoin is as easy as installing the mining software on the PC you already own and clicking start. Anyone can do this and see the money start rolling ... curso oficial de paga que esta ayudando a miles de personas a ganar mucho dinero, si deseas puedes comprarlo con el link de abajo, eso nos ayudarÍa mucho. ht... Bitcoin Mining Geforce 610M video card and Core i5 CPU on the laptop Acer Aspire GUIMINER - mining bitcoin on laptop. Unboxing: Intel Core i5 4590 3.3GHz LGA 1150 - Duration: 2:17. MK-ProductShowcase 3,364 views. 2:17. ... Nice hash Bitcoin mining on CPU (max 80h/s) - Duration: 2:30. rumesh udash 907 views. 2:30 ... Intel i5-8600K Monero RandomX Mining Benchmark Hashrate - XMR Mining The not so expected test - an Intel CPU mining Monero's RandomX.

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